Research Staff

Soapbox Science

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We are excited to announce that Newcastle University will once again be hosting Soapbox Science following our record breaking debut last summer. Would you like to be a part of Soapbox Science Newcastle 2016?

Our call for speakers is NOW OPEN! If you are female, an academic scientist, researcher or PhD student and are keen to share your science with the people of Newcastle then apply using the following link:  http://soapboxscience.org/?page_id=135 . The closing date for applications is Friday the 26th of February 2016.

Soapbox Science is a grass-roots science outreach organisation that brings cutting edge research onto urban streets whilst also promoting the visibility of women in science. We place inspirational speakers on soapboxes and encourage them to engage in and start conversations with the public about their work.

For the Newcastle event we’ll be commandeering Grey’s Monument in the City Centre on Saturday June 18th and wowing unsuspecting passers-by with our latest discoveries.

For a flavour of Soapbox Science Newcastle 2016 have a look at our short film of the day: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUwlqRejo-Y

Soapbox Science has been running for 5 years with events in UK cities across the country and has attracted media coverage including BBC, The Guardian, Time Out, The Times (Eureka). 2016 is Soapbox Science’s biggest year yet with 12 events planned across the UK the first ever international event in Brisbane, Australia. It also receives great interest from the scientific community, with coverage in Nature, Science and New Scientist.

For more information go to www.soapboxscience.org or to contact the Newcastle soapbox science team email soapboxscience.newcastle@gmail.com .

 

Making the leap from academia to industry

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Thinking about how your PhD can be transferred to industry?  Check out this interesting blog post from IT firm Scott Logic.  It’s great to hear how the transferable skills, especially problem solving, gained from PhD research are valued; and that time spent in academia from an industry perspective is viewed so positively.

Interested in finding out more about how your research skills can be used in industry?  Have a look at the Career Mentoring programme for the opportunity to be paired with a mentor working in industry to discuss career options and find out more about career opportunities within an industry setting.

Guest post from our Mentoring Coordinator, Helen Hayes

 

Applying for research funding? Listen to the experts

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Securing research funding is always a fiercely competitive process.

Whilst there’s no changing the degree of competition, expert advice from reviewers and researchers can make a big difference to the quality of your application and may well increase your chances of success. The Guardian recently published a useful summary of top tips for funding applications to help you through the process. It’s definitely worth a look and provides a further reminder of the benefits of talking to others especially those in your field who have already successfully navigated their way through the process.

grants word on paper folder showing scholarship or higher education concept

Researchers Into Schools

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teaching-credentialResearchers in Schools (RIS), which recruits, trains and places researchers from all subject backgrounds to teach in non-selective state schools in a number of locations across the country.

Although applications are open to all researchers who are completing or have completed their doctorate, those who have worked on fields in Maths, Physics and Engineering are eligible to become Maths and Physics Chairs with a considerable salary uplift. This career route is designed to ensure that researchers’ subject knowledge and considerable experience of higher education is maximised in a number of unique ways: Read the rest of this entry »

Got a PhD in science? Now what?

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Really interesting article from a former academic in Australia, on transitioning out of academia. Don’t be put off by the word ‘science’ – having transitioned out of my social science career, I think there’s lots  that researchers in other disciplines can take away from the article.

Got a PhD in science? Now what? › Analysis and Opinion (ABC Science).

Looking for postdoc jobs – are you giving yourself a fighting chance?

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If you’re looking for a postdoc, you’ll need no reminder of the challenges ahead. Limited funding and increasing numbers of applicants makes for fierce competition. Faced with such a gloomy outlook, it’s easy to feel despondent about your chances. Thankfully, statistics rarely convey individual experience. Talk to those who’ve already made it and you’ll quickly learn that much can be done to improve your odds. The Guardian recently did some networking of it’s own and gathered some great tips for those looking for post doc jobs. Post doc

Advice from others is often one of the most helpful approaches to finding work yet many graduates struggle to reach the right people. Working in university research, you’re probably already working alongside (or nearby) those who’ve fought their way to where you want to be. Most people are happy to talk about their experience. Take advantage of your position, talk to those ‘in the know’, follow their advice and give yourself the best possible chance of success and while you’re working through their advice, maybe reading about others‘ six months on from the job hunt will reassure you it can be done.

Looking for first-rate job opportunities in the North East – as well as other locations across the UK?

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DWP siteAs someone who moved to the North East many years ago never thinking they’d be the career opportunities to stay long term, it doesn’t come as a surprise to me when researchers keen to remain here, are concerned about limiting their career prospects if they stay, so it’s always good to share opportunities that help to address this concern and show that higher education isn’t the only place that values higher level research and analytical skills. Read the rest of this entry »